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Eclipse

In just a few days, a rare total solar eclipse will be visible across North America. The path of totality will stretch from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun’s disk.

At the Hall of Justice in Lansing we can expect to see the moon cover 80.0% of the sun. The moon will be in the sun’s path starting at 1:00pm and continue for 2hours 44minutes. The best time to see the peak of the eclipse will be 2:24pm.

The last ti1918-court-collageme a total solar eclipse crossed the nation from the Pacific to the Atlantic was June 8, 1918. On that date it crossed the U.S. from Washington State to Florida, roughly similar to the upcoming total solar eclipse and the last time totality crossed the nation.

In 1918, the Michigan Supreme Court had eight justices. Led by Chief Justice Russell Ostrander, the Court included Justices Joseph MooreFlavius Brooke, John StoneJohn Bird, Joseph SteereFranz Kuhn, and Grant Fellows. Read more about each of these justices by following the link on their name to their biography.

 

 

 

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Annual Luncheon: 1994

We are hard at work on the summer newsletter, which features an extensive recap of this year’s Annual Membership Luncheon. That should go to press next week, and arrive in mailboxes soon thereafter. Until then — thanks to the power of the Internet — you can read Professor John W. Reed’s speech at the third annual membership luncheon, held April 28, 1994, by clicking here.

The Society began in 1988; the first luncheon was held in 1992; and the first newsletter was published in 1997.

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June Birthdays

bdaycakeIn the history of the Michigan Supreme Court, there have been eleven justices born in the month of June and eleven justices who have died. Click on the names below to read more about each of them:

Born in June —

Died in June —

 

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Chipman

chipman

From “American Biographical History of Eminent and Self Made Men of the State of Michigan”. 1878. Facing page 31. Western Biographical Publishing Company (Cincinnati, OH), publisher.

On this date 150 years ago, former Territorial Supreme Court Justice Henry Chipman died in Detroit at age 82. He is buried in Elmwood Cemetery in Detroit.

Henry Chipman was born on July 25, 1784, in Tinmouth, Vermont. His father, Nathaniel Chipman, was a well-known judge, U.S. Senator, and legal writer of his day, and Henry read law with him after graduating in one of the first classes from Middlebury College. While at Middlebury, Henry and his friends founded the Philomathesian Society, a debate society that argued important subjects of the era, including the slavery debate and scenarios that would arise in the event of a Civil War. For his health, Henry moved to Jamaica, and later South Carolina, where he married and ran a law practice in Waterborough from 1809 to 1824 (with a six-month exception for military service during the War of 1812).

The family moved to Detroit in 1824 because they wanted to live in a state without slavery. A committed Whig, Chipman wrote for the Morning Herald and later founded the Detroit Daily Advertiser. In 1825, Chipman was appointed chief judge of the Wayne County (Criminal) Court. President John Quincy Adams gave Chipman a recess appointment to the territorial supreme court on July 18, 1827. Because of his Whig politics, President Andrew Jackson did not re-appoint Chipman to the Court in 1832.  He returned to private practice in Detroit and served on Wayne County’s Criminal Court from 1841-1844. After he retired from law, he continued to write for newspapers.

–Compiled from the Michigan Supreme Court Historical Reference Guide, 2d edition. Purchase this book here.

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Memorial Day

The Society office will be closed on Monday, May 29, in observance of Memorial Day. It seems fitting to note that the holiday originated to honor the 750,000 soldiers killed in battle during the Civil War. Originally called “Decoration Day,” the name of the holiday was changed to Memorial Day in 1967–fifty years ago. This year, the Society’s summer Coleman intern, Trent Koch, will be researching the intersection of the Michigan Supreme Court and the Civil War. Six Michigan Supreme Court Justices served in the Civil War: Copeland, Morse, Long, Cahill, Grant, and Montgomery; and from 1890-1892 four of the five justices were veterans. We’ll have more to share as the summer goes on, as well as news about the middle school and high school lesson plans that our spring Coleman intern Jackie Guzman worked on for us. Stay tuned!

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Movie Night!

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February Birthdays

Although February is the shortest month of the year, it is the month that has the most birthdays of historic Michigan Supreme Court justices — 12.

39-McDonaldJohn McDonald was born on this date (Feb. 8) in 1865 and joined the Court by appointment at age 57. He served from March 29, 1922 through December 31, 1933, and was succeeded on the Court by George Bushnell. You can read his biography here and his memorial here.

 

 

33-KuhnAlso born on this date was Franz Kuhn in 1872. Justice Kuhn was appointed to the Court at age 40 by Governor Chase Osborn to replace Charles Blair (son of war governor Austin Blair). Justice Kuhn served until 1919 when he resigned to become president of the Michigan Bell Telephone Company.

He died in 1926. You can read his memorial here. His biography is here.

 

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#GivingTuesday

riley-givingtuesdayIt’s #GivingTuesday.

We hope that you will consider making a contribution today to honor someone important in your life. Perhaps it was a law school professor or your first boss who inspired you to care deeply about the law. Or, maybe it was hearing the stories of the Michigan Supreme Court from the Justices themselves in our Oral History interviews. Whatever it was that inspired you, when you make a contribution to the Society, you help to support our mission of increasing public awareness of Michigan’s legal heritage. Please give!

Updated: If you use Facebook, you can make a contribution via this link, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will match it, up to $1,000.00.

Tweet to us @micourthistory with who inspired you to care deeply about the law, using the hash tag #mygivingstory

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Bentley

On this date one year ago, the Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan announced that it had acquired the papers of Dr. Jack Kevorkian.

The 1994 Michigan Supreme Court case of People v. Kevorkian was featured in our Verdict of History project, which can be read on our website here and in our recent book The Michigan Supreme Court Historical Reference Guide, Second Edition, which can be purchased on Amazon or wherever books are sold.

The Bentley Historical Library maintains the papers of many former Michigan Supreme Court justices. View the full list by visiting this link.

 

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